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Streaming TV case before Supreme Court on Tuesday

FILE - This July 7, 2010 file photo shows Barry Diller at the annual Allen & Co. Media summit in Sun Valley, Idaho. Thirty years after failing to persuade the Supreme Court of the threat posed by home video recordings, big media companies are back at the high court to try to rein in another technological innovation that they say threatens their financial well-being. The battle has moved out of viewers’ living rooms, where Americans once marveled at their ability to pop a cassette into a recorder and capture their favorite programs or the game they wouldn’t be home to see. Now the entertainment conglomerates that own U.S. television networks are waging a legal fight, with Supreme Court argument on Tuesday, against a start-up business that uses Internet-based technology to give subscribers the ability to watch programs anywhere they can take portable devices. The source of the companies’ worry is Aereo Inc., which takes free television signals from the airwaves and sends them over the Internet to paying subscribers in 11 cities. Aereo, backed by media billionaire Barry Diller, has plans to more than double that total. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a dispute between broadcasters and an Internet startup company that has the potential to bring big changes to the television industry.


Ukraine rebels brace for new assault as US troops head to region

Masked pro-Russia activists wait to prevent planned campaigning visit of presidential candidate Yulia Tymoshenko to the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, on April 22, 2014Slavyansk (Ukraine) (AFP) - Pro-Kremlin rebels in Ukraine braced Wednesday for a renewed military offensive by Kiev as US troops headed to region in a show of force after Washington again warned Moscow over the escalating crisis. The United States said it plans to deploy 600 troops to Poland and the Baltic states to "reassure our allies and partners" after threatening Russia with more sanctions. Ukraine's acting president Oleksandr Turchynov late Tuesday ordered a new "anti-terrorist" operation against separatists holding a string of eastern towns after the discovery of two "brutally tortured" bodies.


Internet TV case: Justices skeptical, concerned

A videojournalist sets up outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 22, 2104. The court is hearing oral arguments between Aereo, Inc., an Internet startup company that gives subscribers access to television on their laptops and other portable devices and the over-the-air broadcasters. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)WASHINGTON (AP) — Grappling with fast-changing technology, Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in the use of the internet.


NYPD's Twitter PR campaign backfires badly

People walk by a New York City police officer in Times Square, on August 12, 2013New York police Tuesday were eating extra helpings of humble pie after asking people to post images of themselves and NYPD officers on Twitter -- only to face a deluge of pictures of alleged police brutality. "Do you have a photo w/ a member of the NYPD? It may be featured on our Facebook," the department posted on its NYPD News Twitter feed, hoping to fuel a feel-good, low-cost public relations campaign.


By: Maryland Real Estate | Baltimore Real Estate | Annapolis Real Estate
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